Northern Cheyenne Tribal Flag
www.tlc.wtp.net/northern.htm

The Northern Cheyenne Reservation is located in southeastern Montana. It covers 445,000 acres and is bounded on the east by the Tongue River and on the west by the Crow Reservation. The tribal headquarters are in Lame Deer.

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Oglala Sioux Flag
www.lakotamall.com/oglalasiouxtribe/history.htm

The Oglala Sioux Tribe is part of the Great Sioux Nation of the Titowan Division. The Great Sioux Nation recognizes our land base in accordance with the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851. The Great Sioux Nation extended from the Big Horn Mountains in the west to the eastern Wisconsin. The territory extended from Canada in the north to the Republican River in Kansas in the south. The Great Sioux Nation was reduced in the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty from the Big Horn Mountains in the west to the east side of the Missouri River, the Heart River in North Dakota in the north and the Platte River in Nebraska to the south. This includes the entire western half of South Dakota.

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Oneida Indian Nation Flag
www.oneida-nation.net/clans.html

Bear, Turtle and Wolf are the three clans of the Oneida Indian Nation.
Ours is a matrilineal society, which means your clan and Nation membership all come from your mother.

Bear: taught us gentleness and strength. 
It takes more strength not to raise your hand to strike someone than it does to strike them. 

Turtle: taught us patience, never to give up. 
Seen as strength and solidarity, old and wise, and well respected.

Wolf: taught us to use our ears and be watchful.
Strong sense of family.

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Otoe Missouria Tribal Flag
Originally two separate tribes, the Otoe lived along the Nemaha and Platte Rivers in Eastern Nebraska, while the Missouria occupied the Lower Missouri River Valley.

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Pawnee Nation Flag
www.pawneenation.org/history.htm

The Pawnee Nation has a long and proud history going back over 700 years. At one time, early in the 19th century, there were over 10,000 members of the Pawnee Nation along the North Platte River in Nebraska.

The Nation then, as it is now, was composed of four distinct bands: the Chaui 'Grand'; the Kitkihahki, 'Republican"; the Petahauirata, 'Tappage"; and Skidi, 'Wolf'. Each band went on separate hunts and often fought separate battles. 

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Pima Maricopa Indian Tribal Flag of Salt River, Arizona
www.commerce.state.az.us/pdf/commasst/comm/
saltrverPimaMaricopa.pdf
Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community is in Maricopa Country of Arizona. It was established on June 14, 1879.

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Powhatan Renape Flag
www.powhatan.org/history.html

We are the native natural people of this land, descendants of an ancient confederation that at one time included over thirty nations. Our people were placed here by the Creator, and have maintained an unbroken history of thousands of years of settlement along the coastal areas of the mid-Atlantic. Although most of our lands are now occupied by others, many of the nation of the original Powhatan Confederacy still survive. The oldest treaty written in this land is between the Powhatan Nations in the year 1646.

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Miwok Tribe of Yosemite Flag
www.sacbee.com/static/archive/news/projects/native/
day3_side.html

In the early 1800s, the Awahneechee chief Tenaya battled a huge black grizzly bear, or "uzumaiti," for the Valley of the Gaping mouth.

After a ferocious struggle, Tenaya killed the uzumaiti and reclaimed paradise. When Europeans came, they called the valley Yosemite, from the word "uzumaiti," and the Indians became known as the Yosemite Valley Miwok.

Today, Tenaya's descendants are engaged in another battle for Yosemite with an opponent far larger and more powerful than the grizzly bear: the United States government.

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Quapaw Tribal Flag
www.geocities.com/Athens/Aegean/1388/
The name "Quapaw" is a derivative of the tribal term Ugakhpa, meaning "down stream people." These people belong to the Dhegiha subdivision of the Sioux. It is believed that this group originally resided in the Ohio Valley. The tribe left this region following the Ohio River downstream to the Mississippi River and eventually to the land which is now Arkansas.

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Quiluete Nation Flag of Washington
www.nps.gov/olym/edprehis.htm
The Quileute Tribe is located on the Pacific Coast of the Olympic Peninsula at the mouth of the Quillayute River. The Quileute language is part of the Chimakuan linguistic family. Today, the only speakers from this family are the Hoh and the Quileute. The Chemakum Tribe, now extinct, also spoke a language in this family. The Quileute were signatories to the Treaty with the Quinault, along with the Hoh Tribe. The Quileute reservation was established in 1889 by presidential proclamation, after it was clear that the Quileute did not want to leave their homeland to live on the Quinault Reservation. 

The Quileute Reservation encompasses 814 acres. The townsite of La Push on the reservation is a destination resort for many visitors to the Olympic Peninsula because of the beauty of its location, open beaches, and proximity to Highway 101. The main economy of the Quileute is fishing, and they market and process salmon at their seafood company. There are about 450 tribal members. 

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Quinault Indian Nation Flag
www.nps.gov/olym/edprehis.htm
The Quinault Indian Nation is located on the Pacific Coast, north of Gray's Harbor. The reservation was created by the provisions of the "Quinaielt River Treaty" of 1855. The intention of the treaty commission was to locate numerous coastal tribes onto this reservation. Today, those who can verify that they are at least one quarter Quinault, Queets, Quileute, Hoh, Chehalis, Cowlitz, or Chinook can become a tribal member, if they are not a member of another tribe. The Queets village is located at the northern end of the reservation, and contains a distinct community from the Quinault village at Taholah, although they share tribal government. The reservation also contains the community of Amanda Park on Lake Quinault. There are approximately 2,385 Quinault Tribal members. 

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Red Lake Ojibwa or Chippewa Flag
www.senate.leg.state.mn.us/departments/scr/report/
bands/chipover.htm
The Red Lake Band is independent of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, has no allotted land, and has a closed legal status.

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Sac Fox of Iowa Flag
www.sacandfoxcasino.com/tribal-history.html
There are three bands of Sac and Fox and they all have their own disinct government and enrollment processes. They are federally recognized:

Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa --- Meshwaki.
Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma --- Sa ki wa ki.
Sac and Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska --- Ne ma ha ha ki.
The Sac and Fox Nation of Missouri are of Algonquian origin and Woodland culture

The Sauk and Fox were originally two distinct groups. During the 1700's a French attack on the Foxes caused the two tribes to join forces and form a close alliance which helped to affect unification.

The Sauk/Sac were called the "People of the Yellow Earth", which distinguishes them from the Foxes who were called the "Red Earth People".

The Sac and Fox Nation have been located in Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, and Nebraska.

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Sac Fox of Oklahoma Flag
See above for commentary.

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Apache Tribe of San Carlos, Arizona Flag
www.itcaonline.com/Tribes/sancarl.htm
The San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation spans Gila, Graham, and Pinal Counties in southeastern Arizona, roaming over a landscape that ranges from alpine meadows to desert. Encompassing 1,834,781 acres, the San Carlos Apache Reservation was established by executive order on November 9, 1871.

Over one-third of the communitys land is forested (175,000 acres) or wooded (665,000) acres). Forest lands, with their jumbled topography, create a naturally superior habitat for many wildlife species causing elk, mule deer, turkeys, black bear and mountain lion to be at home on this reservation. A portion of the reservation is contiguous with the largest stand of ponderosa pines in the world.

The Apaches are descendent of the Athabascan family who migrated to the Southwest in the 10th century. Over time, many bands of Apache were relocated to the reservation from their traditional homelands, which once extended through Arizona and New Mexico.

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Santa Clara Tewa Pueblo Flag
For millennia the people of Santa Clara have known the Jemez Mountains as home. Its people have lived in the region for thousands of years. Prior to settling in the current village, the ancestors of Santa Clara occupied Puje and several other villages which formed an intricate system of cliff houses and mesa-top villages along several volcanic tuff mesas located on the Pajarito Plateau, nine miles west of the current Pueblo. The Pajarito Plateau is a landform that fans out from the Jemez Mountains to make up its eastern foothills.

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