Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is composed of 54 Northwest Indians from: Oregon, Washington, Southeast Alaska, Northern California, and Western Montana.

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Alabama Quassarte Indians Tribal Town
www.users.aol.com/Donh523/navapage/alabama.htm

The Alabama people originated in the southeastern part of the United States in an
area that, today bears their name, the State of Alabama. Today the only recognized distinctive Alabama tribe is located in Texas where they are united with the Coushatta nation. The Alabama, whose name means "weed gatherers" also live on as part of the Creek nation in Oklahoma. 

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Arapaho Tribal Flag
www.cheyenne-arapaho.nsn.us/
Tribe Name: Arapaho originates in the Pawnee term tirapihu, meaning he buys or trades, as the Arapaho were the trading tribe in the Great Plains region. They have long been closely linked with the Cheyenne tribe, who called them Cloud Men. The name given to them by the Sioux has a similar meaning: Blue Cloud Men.

In 1835, the Arapaho tribe divided into the Southern and Northern groups. Oklahoma members are the Southern Arapaho, the largest group; Northern Arapaho live in Wyoming. A treaty with the Arapaho and the Cheyenne in 1867 provided the two tribes with a reservation bounded on the north and east by the Kansas state line and Arkansas River, and on the west and south by the Cimarron River, a tract lying within the Cherokee Outlet in what is now northern Oklahoma. Opposition and uncertainties among the Western Tribes in locating on reservations delayed the settlement of the Plains tribes in western Oklahoma. The Arapaho and Cheyenne did not settle on the reservation assigned to them, but instead located their villages south along the North Canadian River. A presidential proclamation in 1869 assigned a new reservation to the two tribes, in an area along the North Canadian and the upper Washita Rivers. 

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Bay Mills Ojibwe or Chippewa Flag
www.users.aol.com/Donh523/navapage/baymills.htm
One of the two easternmost homes of the Ojibwe or Chippewa people in the
United States is the Bay Mills Indian Community on the northeastern tip of the upper
peninsula of Michigan (The other is the Sault Ste. Marie Ojibwe located nearby).

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Flag of the Blackfeet Nation
www.blackfeetnation.com

The largest and most dominant Indian Tribe in Montana, the Blackfeet have played a significant role in the state's history. Like so many of the Great Plains tribes, the Blackfeet originally lived far to the east in the area north of the Great Lakes. It is thought they even ranged as far east as Labrador. Therefore, anthropologists sometimes classify them in prehistory as one of the eastern woodlands tribes. Like the Cheyenne, Gros Ventre and many others, the Blackfeet are members of the Algonquin linguistic group.

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Oklahoma Caddo Indian Nation Flag
www.users.aol.com/Donh523/navapage/caddo.htm
The modern Caddo people are the descendants of many different tribes that once inhabited Louisiana, southern Arkansas and coastal Texas as far west as the Brazos River. These included the tribes of the Kadohadacho confederacy which gives the modern Caddo their name, the Hasinai Confederacy and the Natchitoches Confederacy. 

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Catawba Tribal Flag
www.dickshovel.com/Catawba.html

Catawba means "river people," and only came into common use in the Carolinas after 1715. The name used by themselves was Iyeye (people) or Nieye(real people). Early Spanish records refer to them as the Iswa (also spelled: Esaw, Isaw, Issa, and Ysa). 17th century Virginia colonists used a variation of this: Usheree(or Ushery, Usi). Also called: Anitagua (Cherokee), Cuttawa, Flathead, Oyadagahroene (Iroquois), Tadirighrone (Iroquois), and Tetes-Plattes (French).

In 1840 the Catawba sold their land to South Carolina at the Treaty of Indian Ford. This was a state, not federal, treaty and probably was a violation of the Nonintercourse Act. The Catawba moved north across the border, but North Carolina refused to provide land for them, so many were forced to return. Despite past differences, the North Carolina Cherokee generously invited the Catawba to join them. Many did, but this did not last. By 1847 most of the Catawba had left the Cherokee and returned to South Carolina. All that remained for them Catawba was 600 acres of their old reservation, and obviously this could not support them. The possibility of moving to the Choctaw section of Oklahoma was explored but ultimately rejected A second attempt to relocate the Catawba west to the Choctaw in Oklahoma also failed during 1853. Still residents of South Carolina, Catawba soldiers fought for the Confederacy during the Civil War, but the census of 1910 could only locate 124 Catawba. Although recognized by South Carolina, the Catawba did not receive federal recognition until 1941. In 1959 they petitioned Congress to terminate their tribal status, and tribal landholdings were distributed among the membership during 1962. The final tribal role call of that year gave a population of a little over 600. After termination, many Catawba emigrated to the Choctaw in southeast Oklahoma. After a change of heart in 1973, the Catawba tribal council was reorganized and recognized by the state of South Carolina. During 1994, the Catawba regained federal recognition after a lengthy court battle.

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Cherokee Nation Flag
www.cherokee.org

The Cherokee Nation, while not a state, was involved in the War Between the States as a foreign ally. While some Cherokee troops were aligned with the Union, some were aligned with the Confederacy.

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Oklahoma Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Flag
www.cheyenne-arapaho.org
Cheyenne: Taken from Sioux words that mean people of an alien speech referring to the Cheyennes native Algonquian language. Cheyenne words for the tribe mean people who are alike.

The Cheyenne were originally agriculturists and pottery makers living in permanent villages in Minnesota. With the westward push of white settlers, they moved west and adopted the roving, buffalo-hunting culture of the Plains Indians.

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Chickasaw Nation Flag
www.chickasaw.net/main.html
From our migration to what is now Mississippi, Kentucky, Alabama and Tennessee in prehistoric times to the purchase of our new homeland in south-central Oklahoma in the mid 1800's, the Chickasaw culture and heritage have always had roots in nature and the elements. With the spirits of our forefathers, we possess a proud history as fierce warriors, known as the "Unconquered and Unconquerable" Chickasaw Nation.

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Choctaw Nation Flag
www.choctawnation.com
The Choctaw Indian Nation traces its ancestry to Mississippi and some sections of Alabama. Legends tell that the Choctaw people originated from "Nanih Waya", a sacred hill near what is now known as Noxapter, Mississippi. "Nanih Waiya" means "Productive Mound" and is often referred to as "The Mother Mound".

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Potawatomi Indians Flag
www.ctct.essortment.com/potawatominatio_rkyt.htm
The Potawatomi were not always known as the Potawatomi. They were the Neshnabek--which means The People. There are various views as to how they got the name "Potawatomi"(People of the Place of the Fire). 

Originally a tribe of the Algonquin race, the Potawatomi were once part of a group of three tribes--the others being the Odawas and the Ojibwas. The name "Potawatomi" could be a translation of the Ojibwe word "potawotmink" which translates as "people of the place of the fire". 

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Colville Confederated Tribes
Colville Confederated Tribes

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Comanche Nation Flag
www.comanchenation.com
Derived from the Great basin mountain culture of the Northern Shoshone, the Comanche adopted a plains existence following their acquisition of the horse in the seventeenth century. They soon left the mountain region and migrated into the area that is now part of western Kansas and eastern Colorado. Following seasonal movements of the buffalo southward, the Comanche moved into Texas and northern Mexico, where they exploited wild mustang herds and joined in extensive trade with existing Native American groups. Eventually, their presence in the vast plains area became so pervasive that the land was referred to as Comancheria.

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Crow Creek Sioux Flag
www.users.aol.com/Donh523/navapage/crowcrk.htm
Located along the north shore of the Big Bend stretch of the Missouri River in South Dakota is the Crow Creek Reservation. It covers approximately 125,000 acres (AID, 43), making it the third smallest reservation in the state. When originally established in 1889, the result of the Treaty of 1868, the was much larger (Presenting the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe, pamphlet, The United Sioux Tribes, undated) . It is home to some 1500 Sioux. It is directly across the river from the Lower Brule Reservation and the two were combined for many years, separating administratively, only in 1971.

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